StreamlineED® PD Streamlines Teaching Equity to Streamline Learning Equity

What are the measurable outcomes of StreamlineED® Professional Development?

Win Elements LLC offers StreamlineED® Professional Development (or, PD) and SAFE POUCH. StreamlineED® PD includes both strategies and technologies to train teachers and administrators to transform school cultures, empower teachers, and engage students by integrating your current technologies in a centralized and flexible website that allow teachers to:

  1. provide and support measurable learning equity for all students
  2. implement flexible organizational strategies that support comprehensive and deeper learning.
  3. create and organize activities and resources that aligned with organization students’ notebooks
  4. re-use and modify activities and organization for years after years
  5. grade students’ responses and provide meaningful feedback in instantly
  6. access data and analysis of learning outcomes in instantly
  7. update gradebook instantly
  8. create non-skippable video lecture with embedded auto-graded questions
  9. create non-skippable Presentations with embedded auto-graded questions
  10. provide all students intervention and support in instantly and easily
  11. create over 12 different types of auto-graded questions with customizable feedbacks
  12. create assessments, practices, and other activities easily
  13. gamify activities easily
  14. engage and check for students’ understanding instantly through tradition direct instruction lecture.
  15. share question banks and resources easily
  16. collaborate to create questions easily and quickly
  17. share and discuss ideas, resources, and strategies easily

TEACHING EXPERIENCES

Our diverse experiences of teaching at Title I public schools allowed us to work with many teachers, administrators, students, and parents. Our comprehensive StreamlineED® PD is co-founded based on their inputs and needs in order to streamline teaching equity to streamline learning equity for all students by streamlining individualized feedback, intervention, and support.

RESEARCH

John Hattie’s Visible Learning

Limitations of Hattie’s finding: Because Hattie’s book is based on 900+ metanalysis of studies prior 2012, implementations of strategies and technologies after 2012 are not considered in his finding. Technologies used in public school classrooms prior 2012 is very limited in functions and availabilities for many teachers. For example, only few schools have 1:1 device and only few teachers have access to today’s technology.  However, the findings on how students are fundamentally unchanged, but it is full effect cannot be achieved without essential technologies of today. As current teachers, we strategize to streamline and maximize the impact of the highest influences using today’s technologies and strategies.

According to John Hattie’s Visible Learning, his top twelve influences from 150 influences on students’ achievements are:

Rank Influence ES
1 Self-reported grades/Student expectations 1.44
2 Piagetian programs 1.28
3 Response to intervention 1.07
4 Teacher credibility 0.90
5 Providing formative evaluation 0.90
6 Micro-teaching 0.88
7 Classroom discussion 0.82
8 Comprehensive interventions for learning disabled students 0.77
9 Teacher clarity 0.75
10 Feedback 0.75
11 Reciprocal teaching 0.74
12 Teacher–student relationships 0.72

The figure shows the top twelve influences according to Hattie’s Visible Learning (Hattie, 2012).

The overarching theme of Hattie’s findings concludes that the highest impact learning occurs when teachers organize their lessons to teach student specific content that build on students prior knowledges, and students are constantly self-assessing, reviewing their prior work, collaborating with others, and receiving individualized intervention.

According to John Hattie’s Visible Learning, his 900+ meta-analysis shows that “self-reported grades/ Student expectations” (ES: 1.44) has the highest influence on students’ achievement. Our strategies to grade all students’ answers and provide meaningful feedback instantly at each student’s pace allow all students instantly to self-assess themselves, learn from errors, think critically, and collaborate with peers (Hattie, 2012).

Hattie’s third highest influence on students’ achievement is “Response to intervention,” with ES of 1.07.  Our strategies to grade all students’ answers and provide meaningful feedback instantly allow teachers to provide meaningful intervention in real-time to diverse groups of students because each students can immediately self-reflect on their own errors, think critically, learn from their mistakes, and collaborate with peers. Most importantly, teachers can provide one-to-one and personalize intervention to each struggling student or a small group of struggling students. (Hattie, 2012).

Hattie’s second highest influence on students’ achievement is “Piagetian programs,” with ES of 1.28 (Hattie, 2012). Piaget’s Cognitive Development Theory shows that people’s cognitive abilities and skills are different at different ages. Most importantly, different children mature at different rates based on their social and academic background and support. Therefore, traditional classroom discussion and lectures in large groups does not support students’ learning achievement. Instead, students need student-paced, individualized, and instant feedback allows students to self-assess, learn from their mistakes, think critically, collaborate with others, or ask for helps when they are genuinely needed.  Teacher-centered instruction and discussion force students to talk rather than allowing each student to discuss genuinely based on their individual needs.

Other Studies and Experiments

  1. Sancho-Venuesa et al. (2013) (as cited in Johnston), found that “the dropout rates and students failures rates had declined and students engagement and academic results had increased when immediate feedback was provided” (Johnston, 2015).  Sacho-Venuesa et al concluded that using the technique of immediate feedback over the learning process did have a positive effect on students’ engagement and confidence and in turn, on student achievement” (as cited in Johnston).
  2. Joseph and Maguire (as cited in Johnston), found from experiment of “236 fourth graders” shows that “students with immediate and 1-day delayed feedback had similar results, but both of those groups did better than students who did not receive feedback until the end of the study”.
  3. Brosvic et al. (2005) experiment also found that students received immediate feedback scored the highest on the final exam and significantly higher than group of students who received no feedback. Altogether, this lead Brosvic et al. to conclude that immediate feedback enhances acquisition and retention of learned material.
  4. Mendicino et al. (2009) “compared learning for fifth grade students in two math homework conditions. The paper-and-pencil condition represented traditional homework, with review of problems in class the following day. The Web-based homework condition provided immediate feedback in the form of hints on demand and step-by-step scaffolding.” Mendicino et al. found that “the mean gain for the Web-based homework group was 2.32 points out of 10 points, and for the paper-and-pencil homework group the gain was 1.14 points out of 10 points.” This result of this study implies that students learned significantly more with Web-based homework.
  5. Singh et al. (2011) study eight graders in a math classes by looking at “learning from homework involved the comparison of immediate-feedback with tutoring versus a control condition where students got feedback the next day in math class.” Singh et al found that students who received web-based feedback has a mean gain of 2.4 while students who did not received feedback had a mean gain of 1.63 out of 10.
  6. Heffernan et a. (2013) experiment shows that web-based homework with immediate feedback has a “learning gains” of 1.73 compared to traditional pencil and paper homework with a “learning gains [of] 0.03”. Furthermore, students with web-based immediate feedback scored an average of 81% compared to traditional group without feedback with an average of 69%. Heffernan et al. findings demonstrated that students receiving correctness feedback significantly enhance students’ acquisition and retention of learned material.
teachers’ stories

Disclaimers: The following teachers volunteered to answer the following questions.

  1. (If Applicable) How do we help you to reduce the number of students tardy to your class (except for first period)?

 Mr. Ahmadi ( 9th –10th Biology/Life Science)  : “I often see students hustling and rushing to make sure they come to my class on time.”

“Students know that they have a window of 8 minutes after the tardy bell rings when coming my Biology class in order to complete their warm ups. Therefore I often see students hustling and rushing to make sure they come to my class on time.” —Dec. 7, 2018

Ms. Lutes ( 9th-10th Biology/ Earth Science) :  “timed warm-up … shuts off automatically”

Students are given a timed warm-up which shuts off automatically after a certain time frame. This results in more students coming to class on time in order to complete it. I have also had situations where students are completing the warm-up on their phone before they get to class because they are tardy. So even though they are not in class on time they are participating in class remotely.—Dec. 11, 2018

  1. Jeska (9-10th Earth Science/ Anatomy): “They know it will … so they know they need to be on time.”

My students know that many days I have bell work q’s (as a review or PREreview to lessons) when they come in. They know it will close 7-10 minutes after the bell–so they know they need to be on time—Dec. 17, 2018

  1. (If Applicable) How do we help you to reduce your grading time? (Would you please estimate how many hours you would save over the course of a year? Total hours from all of your remaining years in your teaching career?)

Mr. Ahmadi ( 9th –10th Biology/Life Science) :   “assessments are graded instantly”  … On grading warm ups alone, I save at least 400 hours yearly.”

My warm ups and assessments are graded instantly. It takes about 1 minute to grade each student’s warm up. I have 120 students enrolled in Biology. Daily this feature saves me 2 hours worth of grading. Weekly, that is 10 hours of grading. Monthly, this is 40 hours. On grading warm ups alone, I save at least 400 hours yearly. That is a lot of time that I can use towards my aspects of improving my instruction and curriculum.  —Dec. 7, 2018

Ms. Lutes ( 9th-10th Biology/ Earth Science):

My grading time has been reduced substantially. [It] automatically generates a score.  —Dec. 11, 2018

  1. Jeska (9-10th Earth Science/ Anatomy): “Auto grading …assessments [produce] tables, forms and graphs for both teacher and students.”

“grading feature for assessments and bell work–material is graded and easy to ready tables, forms and graphs are produced for both teacher and students.” —Dec. 17, 2018

  1. (If Applicable) How do we help you and colleagues to collaborate and share students’ data, lessons, resources, and assessment to give you a meaningful PLC experiences.
  2. Ahmadi ( 9th –10th Biology/Life Science Teacher) : “…data is graphed. Instantly we are provided with bell curves, averages, and means.”

—“All of the data is graphed. Instantly we are provided with bell curves, averages, and means. Additionally, the amount of time per question is accounted for per student. This makes it easier to identify areas [of] student concern and growth with [our] colleagues. “ —Dec. 7, 2018

  1. Jeska (9-10th Earth Science/ Anatomy): “It is easy to create and share lessons…”

“It is easy to create and share lessons on SL-ED –simply export to Google Drive, then recipient downloads lesson and converts it to a usable form. The process takes just a few minutes”—Dec. 17, 2018

  1. (If Applicable) How do we help you save costs on paper and time on copying papers ( Would please give us a estimate on the number sheets of paper you will save annually? Total from all the remaining years of your teaching careers.
  2. Ahmadi ( 9th –10th Biology/Life Science teacher) :

— “The only time I pass out paper is for guided notes and labs. Otherwise all of my work is administered on streamlineed.com. Whereas before [the website] I would go through 1 reams of paper daily, now I go through 1 ream of paper weekly ( at most). So where before I would go through 20 reams of paper monthly. Now with [StreamlineEd.com] I go through 4-5 reams monthly. I am saving 15 reams of paper per month ( each ream of paper is 500 pages). “  —Dec. 7, 2018

  1. Jeska (9-10th Earth Science/ Anatomy): “Hundreds of dollars in paper costs saved!”

No need to copy materials as they are on computer in perpetuity–download next time needed and distribute to students. Hundreds of dollars in paper costs saved! —Dec. 17, 2018

  1. (If Applicable) How do we help you to differentiate your assessments to support your students’ diverse needs during group and independent practices?

Mr. Ahmadi ( 9th –10th Biology/Life Science) :   “[StreamlineED.com] allows me to teach all my students equitably”

— “Students come to us with varying skill levels. Some are exceptionally gifted. but more often my students come to me with several learning deficits. By being able to pin point which areas a student needs most growth in, I can then accommodate towards her needs. [StreamlineED.com] allows me to teach all my students equitably.”  —Dec. 7, 2018

  1. Jeska (9-10th Earth Science/ Anatomy): “Students work at their own pace…”

Students work at their own pace and allows for them to ask questions on tough material as others move forward. Also it allows kids to all work on the same problem with a group facilitator who can employ their own leadership skills to help teach others the material. —Dec. 17, 2018

  1. (If Applicable) How do we help your students to engage and self-assess during direct instruction, which allow you to collect and assess real-time data to differentiate your instruction?

Mr. Ahmadi ( 9th –10th Biology/Life Science) :    “I am able to accurately reward student hard work and progress.”

“I post guided video notes on [StreamlineED.com] that I personally create. I am able to set up a question every minute of the video, where my students are to answer digitally as they take notes physically. When they get a question incorrect, they are then provided with feedback. They then use this feedback to reattempt the question. I can see the amount of time each student spent on each question of each assignment and how many times each assignment was attempted. Last year I had a special education student attempt an assignment no less than 8 times, just to get a passing grade. I am able to accurately reward student hard work and progress.” —Dec. 7, 2018

 

Ms. Lutes ( 9th-10th Biology/ Earth Science):   “This allows me to differentiate my instruction in real-time.”                     

—“I am able to look at the scores of each student and determine how they are performing very quickly. This allows me to differentiate my instruction in real-time. Students are able to see their scores immediately which allows them to see they are doing in real-time and assess what they need to do to improve. “ —Dec. 11, 2018

  1. Jeska (9-10th Earth Science/ Anatomy): “Students see their scores in real time with immediate feedback on what they get right and wrong.”

—”Students see their scores in real time with immediate feedback on what they get right and wrong. They are given MULTIPLE attempts to facilitate effort and to empower their growth mindset to keep trying to get a portion of the avail points eg. .66 instead of a zero. I can see the result of the bell work q’s about 10 minutes into class and can quickly analyze the results and re-teach if necessary. I can do this for all manner of formative assessments as well as summative assessments for planning next year’s curriculum.”—Dec. 17, 2018

  1. (If Applicable) How do we help you to reduce planning time in the future after you have invested the time to create all the work on streamlineED.com? How is it compared to creating work on district-purchased software?

Mr. Ahmadi ( 9th –10th Biology/Life Science) :       “Last year I created over 500 Biology questions for assessments”

“Last year I created over 500 Biology questions for assessments. This year I have added about a 100 more questions, but most of time is now dedicated to facilitating instruction and better honing my craft as an educator.” —Dec. 7, 2018

  1. Jeska (9-10th Earth Science/ Anatomy): “they are easy to locate for future use in following years or to share with colleagues.”

“After I have created materials and saved them–they are easy to locate for future use in following years or to share with colleagues. This frees me up to continue to improve my knowledge of content areas and improve y teaching with use of new teaching strategies”—Dec. 17, 2018

  1. (If Applicable) Would you recommend others to use our Professional Development and our services?

Mr. Ahmadi ( 9th –10th Biology/Life Science) :    “Unhesitatingly and wholeheartedly I recommend the utilization of [the service] to all educators.”  

—“Unhesitatingly and wholeheartedly I recommend the utilization of [StreamlineED.com] to all educators. Data driven instruction is the ideal that American education is striving towards. [StreamlineED.com] is the means to achieve that end, and what a splendid job it does.  —Dec. 7, 2018

Ms. Lutes ( 9th-10th Biology/ Earth Science):   “It has improved my classroom management and I do not spend time at home grading anymore.”
—“I would definitely encourage other teachers to use this service. It has improved my classroom management and I do not spend time at home grading anymore.” —Dec. 11, 2018

  1. Jeska (9-10th Earth Science/ Anatomy): “Most definitely!!!”

“Most definit  ely!!! The aspects of this system will change your instruction in so many ways and really opens the eyes of both teachers and students so that both can grow!”—Dec. 17, 2018

  1. (If Applicable): Do you think our Professional Development and Resources will help improve your CAASPP Math or ELA score school-wide? How would it benefits Math Classes? ELA classes?

Mr. Ahmadi ( 9th –10th Biology/Life Science) :  “I absolutely believe that [StreamlineED.com] would improve math and ELA scores.”

“I absolutely believe that [service] would improve math and ELA scores. As a science teacher, my course is already a summation of mathematics, [English] language arts, and artistry. If the summation is improving in its scores, then of course the sub components would stand to improve. [It] promotes self-accountability and rewards hard work, of course it will be successful.”  —Dec. 7, 2018

  1. Jeska (9-10th Earth Science/ Anatomy): “Yes! yes! Yes!”

References

  1. Brosvic, G. M., Epstein, M. L., Cook, M. J., & Dihoff, R. E. (2005). Efficacy of error for the correction of initially incorrect assumptions and of feedback for the affirmation of correct responding: Learning in the classroom. The Psychological Record55(3), 401-418.
  2. Gardner, H. E. (2008). Multiple intelligences: New horizons in theory and practice. Basic Books.
  3. Hattie, J. (2012). Visible learning for teachers: Maximizing impact on learning. Routledge.
  4. Johnston, K. (2015). The Effects of Immediate Correctness Feedback on Student Learning, Understanding, and Achievement(Doctoral dissertation).
  5. Joseph, C. H., & Maguire, T. O. (1982). The interaction between time of feedback and academic self-concept on level of performance in arithmetic skill. The Journal of Educational Research75(6), 360-365.
  6. Kelly, K., Heffernan, N., Heffernan, C., Goldman, S., Pellegrino, J., & Goldstein, D. S. (2013, July). Estimating the effect of web-based homework. In International Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Education(pp. 824-827). Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg.
  7. Marzano, R. J., Pickering, D., & Pollock, J. E. (2001). Classroom instruction that works: Research-based strategies for increasing student achievement.
  8. Mendicino, M., Razzaq, L., & Heffernan, N. T. (2009). A comparison of traditional homework to computer-supported homework. Journal of Research on Technology in Education41(3), 331-359.
  9. Sancho-Vinuesa, T., Escudero-Viladoms, N., & Masià, R. (2013). Continuous activity with immediate feedback: A good strategy to guarantee student engagement with the course. Open Learning: The Journal of Open, Distance and e-Learning28(1), 51-66.
  10. Singh, R., Saleem, M., Pradhan, P., Heffernan, C., Heffernan, N. T., Razzaq, L., … & Mulcahy, C. (2011, June). Feedback during web-based homework: the role of hints. In International Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Education(pp. 328-336). Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg.

Disclaimer:  All authors, researches, product names, logos, and brands are the property of their respective owners. All authors, studies, products, logos in this document are for identification purposes only. The use of these names, logos, and brands does not imply endorsement.